I like people, dogs, food, bikes, skateboards and sleeping.

thewomentakeover:

"A feminist to me is someone that believes in equal rights and equal opportunities for all people regardless of gender (or sexuality, or ethnicity, or socioeconomic status). And hell yes it applies to me. Feminism to me goes beyond just gender issues- it encompasses everything.”
Read Emily V Gordon’s interview here.

thewomentakeover:

"A feminist to me is someone that believes in equal rights and equal opportunities for all people regardless of gender (or sexuality, or ethnicity, or socioeconomic status). And hell yes it applies to me. Feminism to me goes beyond just gender issues- it encompasses everything.”

Read Emily V Gordon’s interview here.

Aaron James Draplin, Graphic Artist
“I like to get the client involved. Fuck all the standoff-ish, “This is my creative endeavor and you better pick one” stuff. Work with people. Let them guide you as much as you guide them. That makes for ownership from all sides, you know? Designers are so good at bitching about changes, and how many hours they had to work, and all that shit. Whatever. Spend a summer trimming trees for a rural electricity company, and you’ll never lament another client change, ever. I don’t miss those bald-faced hornets that use to come after me.”
If you’re a creative, you will find value in reading this interview - here. 

Aaron James Draplin, Graphic Artist

I like to get the client involved. Fuck all the standoff-ish, “This is my creative endeavor and you better pick one” stuff. Work with people. Let them guide you as much as you guide them. That makes for ownership from all sides, you know? Designers are so good at bitching about changes, and how many hours they had to work, and all that shit. Whatever. Spend a summer trimming trees for a rural electricity company, and you’ll never lament another client change, ever. I don’t miss those bald-faced hornets that use to come after me.”

If you’re a creative, you will find value in reading this interview - here

NOT GREAT, BOB!
thewomentakeover:

“So part of what I tried to do with this book was re-frame feminine values into more inclusive language. When most guys hear “women’s issues” they think, “Those aren’t my issues.” Our book is about championing the virtues, skills and competencies of women and helping men understand that they too can harness these traits for competitive advantage.” 
- John Gerzema, Co-Creator of The Athena Doctrine
Read the entire interview here.

thewomentakeover:

“So part of what I tried to do with this book was re-frame feminine values into more inclusive language. When most guys hear “women’s issues” they think, “Those aren’t my issues.” Our book is about championing the virtues, skills and competencies of women and helping men understand that they too can harness these traits for competitive advantage.” 

- John Gerzema, Co-Creator of The Athena Doctrine

Read the entire interview here.

"For us, as long as it seems well thought out, has good design sensibilities, feels like it has emotion and feeling in it, and is interesting to look at." 
From my latest interview with DABS & MYLA. www.leftfieldproject.com/dabs-myla-artists/

wilwheaton:

Put this inside a giant circle that says Don’t Be a Dick and you’ve got my fundamental rules for life.


Yes. It’s easy.

wilwheaton:

Put this inside a giant circle that says Don’t Be a Dick and you’ve got my fundamental rules for life.

Yes. It’s easy.

just. perfect. 

just. perfect. 

Current status. 

Current status. 

thewomentakeover:

Leith Clark is a fashion icon, sure, but she’s so so much more. Besides being a stylist extraordinaire and a Senior Contributing Editor at Harper’s Bazaar UK, she started her own magazine called Lula, which speaks to so much more than beautiful clothing.
It’s impossible to walk by an issue of Lula and not pick it up; its large format and gorgeously whimsical images seem to jump off the page. Once you get inside, however, you find that each article and spread has true meaning, and boasts powerful and inspirational imagery for women everywhere.
You started Lula Magazine, a beautiful and powerfully feminine publication. What was your inspiration? When did you decide to take the leap and go for it?I didn’t feel like I was represented in the magazines I was seeing at the time. And I often felt offended by the way women were portrayed. So I created a magazine for me. I was definitely searching for a place where femininity and feminism could connect, and I was desperate to return to a place where dressing up wasn’t about objectifation or status, but rather more about creativity and beauty and even, and sometimes knowingly perhaps, power.
How do you define “feminism”?Feminism is equality, freedom, self respect and opportunity.
Read the rest of the interview here.
Image by Frederic Aranda.

thewomentakeover:

Leith Clark is a fashion icon, sure, but she’s so so much more. Besides being a stylist extraordinaire and a Senior Contributing Editor at Harper’s Bazaar UK, she started her own magazine called Lula, which speaks to so much more than beautiful clothing.

It’s impossible to walk by an issue of Lula and not pick it up; its large format and gorgeously whimsical images seem to jump off the page. Once you get inside, however, you find that each article and spread has true meaning, and boasts powerful and inspirational imagery for women everywhere.

You started Lula Magazine, a beautiful and powerfully feminine publication. What was your inspiration? When did you decide to take the leap and go for it?
I didn’t feel like I was represented in the magazines I was seeing at the time. And I often felt offended by the way women were portrayed. So I created a magazine for me. I was definitely searching for a place where femininity and feminism could connect, and I was desperate to return to a place where dressing up wasn’t about objectifation or status, but rather more about creativity and beauty and even, and sometimes knowingly perhaps, power.

How do you define “feminism”?
Feminism is equality, freedom, self respect and opportunity.

Read the rest of the interview here.

Image by Frederic Aranda.

When was super depressed, I wasn’t working—I was always too depressed. Hemingway did his best work when he didn’t drink, then he drank himself to death and blew his head off with a shotgun. Someone asked John Cheever, “What’d you learn from Hemingway?” and he said “I learned not to blow my head off with a shotgun.” I remember going to the Michigan poetry festival, meeting Etheridge Knight there and Robert Creeley. Creeley was so drunk—he was reading and he only had one eye, of course, and had to hold his book like two inches from his face using his one good eye. But you look at somebody like George Saunders—I think he’s the best short story writer in English alive—that’s somebody who tries very hard to live a sane, alert life.

You’re present when you’re not drinking a fifth of Jack Daniel’s every day. It’s probably better for your writing career, you know? I think being tortured as a virtue is a kind of antiquated sense of what it is to be an artist.

-

In an interview with The FixMary Karr debunks the toxic mythology that it is necessary to be damaged in order to be creative. My own vehement defiance to that mythology is what led me to choose Ray Bradbury – the ultimate epitome of creating from joy rather than suffering – as the subject of my contribution to The New York Times’ The Lives They Lived.

Pair with Karr on why writers write.

(via explore-blog)

thewomentakeover:

“The best way to encourage women not to judge other women is to encourage and create connections between them. When someone is human and vulnerable, it’s a whole lot harder to make blanket statements and judgments about her. On a larger scale, we need to stop portraying women as catty b*tches out to get each other. If girls grow up seeing complicated, deep relationships between women who are working together instead of against each other in real life and in pop culture, they’re less likely to expect those judgments from other women or to level them themselves.” - Emma Gray
Read the rest of the interview here.
Photo by Andres Bohorquez.

thewomentakeover:

“The best way to encourage women not to judge other women is to encourage and create connections between them. When someone is human and vulnerable, it’s a whole lot harder to make blanket statements and judgments about her. On a larger scale, we need to stop portraying women as catty b*tches out to get each other. If girls grow up seeing complicated, deep relationships between women who are working together instead of against each other in real life and in pop culture, they’re less likely to expect those judgments from other women or to level them themselves.” - Emma Gray

Read the rest of the interview here.

Photo by Andres Bohorquez.

neil-gaiman:

-Neil Gaiman  (Make Good Art)

The Chip Kidd designs for the book are remarkable…

And it’s published tomorrow.

We’ve begun to raise daughters more like sons… but few have the courage to raise our sons more like our daughters. - Gloria Steinem

We’ve begun to raise daughters more like sons… but few have the courage to raise our sons more like our daughters. - Gloria Steinem